Sunday, April 14, 2024

Microsoft is badgering even more Windows 10 users to upgrade to Windows 11

Share

Windows 11 upgrade nag screen

Windows users are well aware that Microsoft is no stranger to trying to nag them into submission. The company has a history of pestering users to switch to its web browser and to upgrade to the latest version of Windows, and this is a practice that it not only continuing, but expanding.

Microsoft has already been encouraging / nagging (delete as you see fit…) to upgrade from Windows 10 to Windows 11, and now the company has announced that it is about to take this further. It is described rather euphemistically as “expanding invitations to move to Windows 11 to more people”.

See also:

In what it describes as “good news”, Microsoft says that more Windows 10 users will soon be pestered about upgrading to Windows 11.

In a post on the Windows IT Pro blog, the company says:

Good news if you rely on Microsoft to manage your organization’s Windows updates for you. Starting with the April 2024 security update, Windows users working on cloud-domain joined and domain joined non-managed business devices will see invitation messages about free upgrades to Windows 11. That’s part of our mission to help keep your organization protected and productive.

The full-screen prompt can be seen at the top of this article, and Microsoft says of it:

The invitation to upgrade to Windows 11 will appear after signing in and usually following a reboot. It will only show on Windows 10 Pro and Pro Workstation devices that are eligible for Windows 11 and are not managed by IT departments. Once prompted, users will be able to opt to get Windows 11, version 23H2 or stay in Windows 10. Of course, we recommend Windows 11!

While there is the option to upgrade now or to schedule the upgrade for later, users might miss the option to stick with Windows 10. Slightly controversially, Microsoft has decided to place the “Keep Windows 10” option entirely separate from the option relating to upgrading to Windows 11. The decision was also taken — arguably deceptively — to use a link to indicate a preference to stick with Windows 10 rather than the more obvious buttons relating to upgrading.

Read more

Local News